Boudin Bakery

San Francisco's Famous Sourdough Since 1849
Boudin Bakery
The best sourdough bread I've ever had. I can just eat a whole loaf with nothing else, no joke. But when I discovered their animal shaped doughs, I realized what perfect gifts they make. They are so cute I sometimes don't know if I should cuddle them or eat them!
Vanessa Torrivilla - The Pie Pimp

Usually telling someone that the bread they are about to enjoy is made with ingredients more than 150 years old is not a great selling point. But that’s not the case at Boudin Bakery. Their story is really quite amazing. Created more than a century and a half ago in a tiny, old-world bakery owned by the Boudin family, the credit for Boudin’s consistently fragrant and tangy taste all belongs to the mother dough, which is the yeasted dough that is used to start every loaf. And we mean every loaf. From the very first one pulled out of the oven in 1849 to the one being shipped to your door. It’s okay, we don’t get how either. This mother dough is so precious that during the Great Earthquake and Fire of 1906, Louise Boudin saved it in a bucket as the city shook and burned around her. Now that’s true dedication.

We're not the only ones who love them!

Boudin's legendary sourdough has been featured in USA Today, The SF Chronicle, The NY Times and on Travel Channel.

Boudin Bakery

San Francisco's Famous Sourdough Since 1849

Usually telling someone that the bread they are about to enjoy is made with ingredients more than 150 years old is not a great selling point. But that’s not the case at Boudin Bakery. Their story is really quite amazing. Created more than a century and a half ago in a tiny, old-world bakery owned by the Boudin family, the credit for Boudin’s consistently fragrant and tangy taste all belongs to the mother dough, which is the yeasted dough that is used to start every loaf. And we mean every loaf. From the very first one pulled out of the oven in 1849 to the one being shipped to your door. It’s okay, we don’t get how either. This mother dough is so precious that during the Great Earthquake and Fire of 1906, Louise Boudin saved it in a bucket as the city shook and burned around her. Now that’s true dedication.

We're not the only ones who love them!

Boudin's legendary sourdough has been featured in USA Today, The SF Chronicle, The NY Times and on Travel Channel.